unclefather:

thelilnan:

darylfranz:

【画像】 カニvsワニ! カニの勝利! - ゴールデンタイムズ

i’m sure people know this, but for those of you who don’t, alligators and crocodiles (this is a gator) have some of the most powerful jaws on earth—if they’re biting down. their muscles are made to clamp and hold while its body twists, taking down its prey and (typically) drowning it. however, they have next to no opening power, meaning this crab’s claw has rendered this gator almost powerless

"shhh stop talking"

Excited for Attenborough’s new doc on BBC/23rd Oct. He’s been filming at the Great Barrier Reef again :D

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

manta-rays-on-gallifrey:

neilnevins:

stunningpicture:

A seahorse admiring his own reflection from a divers watch.

or maybe he’s checking the time. seahorses got places to go too y’know

The seahorse is one of the slowest fish in the ocean, the smallest able to move themselves at about 6 feet per hour. So if that seahorse has someplace to be I hope they’ve left a lot of time to get there.

"There is no way I am going to be able to pick the kids up from soccer practice now…"

mare-vitae:

hoe-hovahne:

ichthyologist:

Thresher Shark (Alopias sp.)

Thresher sharks are large sharks found in all temperate and tropical oceans of the world. They can be easily distinguished by their long caudal fin, which can be as long as the shark’s body. This fin is actively used as a weapon to stun fish. After herding the fish into a tight group, the shark swims quickly at the prey and uses its tail like a whip to stun several fish at once.

Rafn Igni Finnsson on Flickr, gif via PLOS media on Youtube

mare-vitae

they’re so awesome

Remember that we’re in the Queen Elizabeth Lei. Centre tomorrow at 12pm for some games and activities in the pool!
We’re gonna play water volleyball, fin swimming and underwater photography. Come along about 10 mins early so you miss the rush for lockers ;)

bubblevision:

Following on from the series, here is my “Mucky Secrets" documentary in full. It’s a nature documentary about the marine life of the Lembeh Strait at the heart of the Coral Triangle off north Sulawesi in Indonesia. The Lembeh Strait is a popular scuba diving destination, famed for its excellent "muck diving". A huge diversity of weird and wonderful marine creatures can be found on the mucky seabed, including everything from tropical fish to benthic sharks to nudibranchs. Critters compete for survival with an armoury including camouflage, mimicry, toxicity, and dazzling coloration.

"Mucky Secrets" is an excellent resource for scuba divers, aquarists, marine biology students and anybody interested in the underwater world. The documentary features underwater macro footage from many of Lembeh’s famous dive sites including Critter Hunt, Police Pier, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu, Nudi Falls, Aer Perang, Jahir, Makawide, Nudi Retreat, Retak Larry, TK (Teluk Kembahu), Hairball and Aw Shucks.

Marine life featured in the film:

0:00:00 Introduction
0:05:11 Corals
0:05:57 Tunicates - sea squirts - ascidians
0:06:37 Symbiosis - sea anemones - anemonefish (clownfish)

CRUSTACEANS
0:07:29 Commensal shrimps (partner shrimps)
0:09:12 Emperor shrimp
0:11:07 Mantis shrimps
0:12:34 Squat lobsters
0:13:27 Hermit crabs
0:14:26 True crabs
0:15:55 Sea Urchins

ELASMOBRANCHS
0:17:11 Blue spotted stingrays
0:18:15 Brownbanded bamboo shark

EELS
0:18:59 Snake eels
0:20:27 Moray eels
0:21:34 Ribbon eels

REEF FISHES
0:22:33 Cardinalfishes
0:24:43 Trumpetfish
0:25:58 Seahorses
0:27:06 Pygmy seahorse
0:28:30 Pipefishes
0:30:38 Ghost pipefishes
0:33:22 Shrimpfishes - razorfishes
0:33:58 Seamoths - short dragonfish
0:35:03 Oriental flying gurnard
0:35:58 Blennies
0:36:49 Gobies
0:37:46 Sea pen
0:38:17 Dragonets
0:40:49 Mandarinfish
0:42:08 Frogfishes
0:46:39 Juvenile fishes
0:47:12 Spotted parrotfish
0:48:20 Sweetlips
0:49:05 Yellowblotch razorfish
0:49:37 Filefishes
0:50:24 Boxfishes - cowfishes
0:50:57 Puffers (pufferfish)
0:52:21 Sharpnose puffers (tobies)
0:52:50 Porcupinefishes
0:53:45 Panther grouper
0:54:10 Whitemargin stargazer
0:54:54 Leopard flounder
0:55:25 Flatheads
0:56:36 Scorpionfishes
0:57:27 Ambon Scorpionfish
0:58:04 Rhinopias
0:59:50 Lionfishes
1:02:29 Demon stinger (spiny devilfish, bearded ghoul)
1:03:17 Fireworm
1:03:45 Waspfishes

MOLLUSCS
CEPHALOPODS
1:05:48 Cuttlefishes
1:08:38 Octopuses
1:11:34 Flame scallop
GASTROPODS
1:12:03 Sea snails
1:14:37 Sea slugs - nudibranchs
1:21:49 Sea slugs feeding
1:23:57 Nudibranchs mating
1:26:11 Sap-sucking slug
1:26:59 Headshield slugs
1:27:49 Sea hares
1:30:21 Polyclad flatworm
1:31:18 End credits